Watercress

Watercress is one of the oldest known and most revered leaf vegetables consumed by human beings. Its history can be traced back 3,000 years to the Persians, Greeks and Romans. A member of the mustard family, watercress remains a vital part of the Mediterranean diet. Most commonly, watercress is eaten out of hand, combined with other greens in salads or used as a garnish on hot or cold dishes. Just adding a few ounces of chopped watercress to a soup will add a wallop of nutritional value. As a matter of fact, watercress contains more iron than spinach, more calcium than milk and three times more vitamin E than lettuce. What's more, watercress is low in calories and is loaded with vitamins A and C. Scientists around the world are starting to substantiate the "folklore" of the nutritional properties of watercress. Turn over a new leaf and make watercress an essential part of your diet.

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  • Nutrition Info
  • Serving Size: 1 cup, 34g
  • Amount per serving
  • Calories: 4
  • Calories from fat: 0
  • Fat: 0g
  • Cholesterol: 0mg
  • Sodium: 14mg
  • Total Carbs: 0.4g
    • Fiber: 0.2g
    • Sugars: g
  • Protein: 0.8g
  • Vitamin A: 22%
  • Vitamin C: 24%
  • Calcium: 4%
  • Iron: 0%

Availability

Handling & Storage

Varieties

All Year

Also Known As

  • Brunnenkress
  • Crescione
  • Nerokarthamon
  • nasturtium officinale

Store at 32-36° F

 

  • Red Watercress
  • Green Watercress

Recipes

No recipes are currently available for this item.